The older population in Australia is rising and so is life-limiting illnesses such as cancer and dementia, and consequently the use of medication.

However, evidence suggest that this vulnerable group of patients continue to receive medications that are considered inappropriate. Therefore, a potential approach to minimise the risks associated with medications and consequently improve their quality of life is 'deprescribing'.

Deprescribing is a process that involves withdrawal (or dose reduction) of an inappropriate medication, supervised by a healthcare professional. However, its implementation in clinical practice is challenging. Hence, understanding the attitudes and beliefs of patients, patient parties and health care professionals, who are part of the process, could assist in developing effective deprescribing strategies.

Therefore, this survey aims to understand your attitude and beliefs towards deprescribing in older patients with life-limiting illness and limited life expectancy.

This research study runs from 01/06/2020 to 31/11/2020.

Participation benefits:

Contribute to the exploration of deprescribing research in Australia.

Eligibility:

Patients

  • Aged 65 years and above
  • Taking one or more prescription medication
  • Under palliative care
  • Able to consent

Caregivers

  • Currently an informal caregiver for an older adult (defined as having any role in a family member or friend’s management of health and /or medications)
  • Care recipient must be 18 years and above
  • Regardless of place of care

Health care professionals

  • Working or had experience working in palliative setting or interest in palliative care or involved as a member of a palliative care team or palliative care organisation
  • Registered physician, nurse, nurse practitioner or pharmacist
  • Pharmacist work experience may also involve palliative medication management in the community pharmacies.

Register your interest:

Access the survey on your mobile, PC, tablet.

For more details, please email Shakti Shrestha (PhD candidate) or phone +61 402 981 389.

This study has been approved by The University of Queensland Human Research Ethics Committee [Approval No. 2019002110]