Friday, October 27, 2017 - 13:30
Professor Robyn Tate

Recover Injury Research Centre and the Centre of Research Excellence in Recovery Following Road Traffic Injuries (CRE) present the first guest lecture of the 2017 series.

Presented By: Professor Robyn Tate from The University of Sydney, Australia
Single-case Designs in Health Research: Striving for Level 1 Evidence
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Date: Tuesday 14th November, 2017
Time: 12:00 - 1:00pm
Location: Lecture Theatre Room S402, Social Sciences building (24), UQ St Lucia

You can access the live streaming of the presentation here: https://lecture.recordings.uq.edu.au:8443/ess/echo/presentation/5e68772c-8868-494d-a919-d4d883f60e69


Biography
Dr Robyn Tate is a research professor at the John Walsh Centre for Rehabilitation Research, Kolling Institute of Medical Research, Sydney Medical School, and University of Sydney.  Her background is in clinical and neuropsychology, and she has extensive clinical experience in the rehabilitation of traumatic brain injury.   Professor Tate is well known for her work in single-case methodology where she has published widely, and led an international team in producing the SCRIBE 2016, a CONSORT-style reporting guideline for single-case experimental designs in the behavioural sciences.

Abstract
Single-case designs, as a research methodology, have had a checkered history, in both the behavioural sciences and the medical field (where they are more commonly known as N-of-1 trials).  In part, this is due to confusion about what constitutes single-case methodology, as well as the poor standard of many studies reported in the literature.  An overview of some possible designs within single case research will be illustrated with examples from clinical practice. More recently, the randomised N-of-1 trial has been classified as providing Level 1 evidence for treatment decision purposes.  As other disciplines embrace single-case methodology as a complement to the traditional between-groups design, the challenge is to make high quality single-case research, from whatever field, the standard of practice.  The present paper discusses the above issues and introduces a critical appraisal tool (The Risk of Bias in N-of-1 Trials Scale) that can be used as a practical guide for planning and conducting scientifically rigorous single-case research.

RSVP: recover@uq.edu.au by the 12 November 2017.

For further information, contact Jane Nikles, +61 7 3346 5025, uqjnikle@uq.edu.au