The aim of this study is to investigate the effectiveness of Compassionate Mind Training among university students experiencing self-criticism.

University students are faced with multiple psychological and social stressors throughout their studies. This puts them at risk of experiencing poorer psychological wellbeing and self-criticism. Diminished psychological wellbeing is associated with poorer academic outcomes, university dropout and poorer social functioning.

Compassionate Mind Training was developed to target self-criticism and promotes wellbeing by cultivating compassion. Research suggests CMT can significantly reduce psychological distress and self-criticism, and improve wellbeing.

Details of the study include: 

  • Participants who wish to participate in the study will be required to attend an 8 consecutive-week group therapy session at the School of Psychology, the University of Queensland, St Lucia.
  • Each session will run for 150 minutes, with groups consisting of approximately 20 people and 2 facilitators (a registered clinical psychologist and a provisional psychologist). Group programs will start between the end of February and beginning of March, 2022. We are aiming to run groups on a Monday.
  • Spaces are limited for the program. In total we will be recruiting up to 80 participants. We will be recruiting from January 2022 until spaces are filled.
  • Participants will be required to complete questionnaires at 3 time points, 1) upon recruitment, 2) at week 8 and 3) at a 3-month follow-up.
  • Participants will be required to attend all sessions.
  • There is no cost, outside of the time to complete the questionnaires. All sessions are free.

Eligibility 

  • Participants must be over the age of 18.
  • Participants must be studying at the University of Queensland.
  • Participants must have at least moderate levels of self-criticism. This will be assessed by the researchers.

Register your interest

Register your interest by completing the form in the link below. 

Register your interest

This study has been approved by The University of Queensland Human Research Ethics Committee [Approval No.2021/HE001780]